• objective outcomes

    Our volunteers hone their clinical skills by properly assessing their patient's condition and setting achievable outcome goals.
  • community supported

    The care we provide is deeply appreciated and the communities we serve trust our commitment, knowledge and expertise.
  • Building relationships

    Learning to understand each other and truly listen is the first step in building trust and lasting friendships.
  • Providing Access

    According to the World Health Organization, Nepal's healthcare system ranks 150th in the world with less than one doctor per 6000 people.
  • confidence

    Our volunteers acquire the confidence to serve as primary care providers, treating 15 to 25 patients per day in our community style clinic.
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Our Mission

Our unique model provides effective, efficient, primary care in rural Nepal. Read More
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Our Clinics

Since 2008, our clinics have provided over 350,000 primary care visits. Read More
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Our Partners

Influencing government policy and achieving educational goals. Read More
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Volunteer With Us

We need your help. Serve others while learning new skills. Read More
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Our Evidence

Case studies and field research helps us analyze our efficacy. Read More
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VOLUNTEER COMMUNITY CARE CLINICS IN NEPAL

Nepal remains one of the poorest countries in the world and has been plagued with political unrest and military conflict for the past decade. In 2015, a pair of major earthquakes devastated this small and fragile country. 

Since 2008, the Acupuncture Relief Project has provided over 300,000 treatments to patients living in rural villages outside of Kathmandu Nepal. Our efforts include the treatment of patients living without access to modern medical care as well as people suffering from extreme poverty, substance abuse and social disfranchisement.

Common conditions include musculoskeletal pain, digestive pain, hypertension, diabetes, stroke rehabilitation, uterine prolapse, asthma, and recovery from tuberculosis treatment, typhoid fever, and surgery.

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Featured Case Studies

  • Low Back Pain with Urinary Difficulties +

    32-year-old woman presents with constant low back pain and burning urination. She has been diagnosed with severe hydronephrosis Read More
  • Ankylosing Spondylitis +

    25-year-old male presents with low back and sacroiliac pain, beginning approximately 15 months prior to consultation at this Read More
  • Sequelae of Osteoarticular Tuberculosis +

    Rachael Haley BAppSci (TCM)December 2014 OVERVIEW A 58-year-old man, of rural Nepal, presents with left hip pain, reduced Read More
  • Stroke Sequela +

    50-year-old male presents with post-stroke sequelae symptoms manifesting as severe right-sided paralysis. After 10 treatments starting in September Read More
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Compassion Connect : Documentary Series

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    In the aftermath of the 2015 Gorkha Earthquake, this episode explores the challenges of providing basic medical access for people living in rural areas.

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    Episode 1: Rural Primary Care

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    Acupuncture Relief Project tackles complicated medical cases through accurate assessment and the cooperation of both governmental and non-governmental agencies.

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    EPISODE 2: INTEGRATED MEDICINE

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    Cooperation with the local government yields a unique opportunities to establish a new integrated medicine outpost in Bajra Barahi, Makawanpur, Nepal.

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    EPISODE 3: WORKING WITH THE GOVERNMENT

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    Complicated medical cases require extraordinary effort. This episode follows 4-year-old Sushmita in her battle with tuberculosis.

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    EPISODE 4: CASE MANAGEMENT

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    Drug and alcohol abuse is a constant issue in both rural and urban areas of Nepal. Local customs and few treatment facilities prove difficult obstacles.

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    EPISODE 5: SOBER RECOVERY

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    Interpreters help make a critical connection between patients and practitioners. This episode explores the people that make our medicine possible and what it takes to do the job.

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    EPISODE 6: THE INTERPRETERS

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    This episode looks at the people and the process of creating a new generation of Nepali rural health providers.

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    EPISODE 7: FUTURE DOCTORS OF NEPAL

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    In this 2011, documentary, Film-maker Tristan Stoch successfully illustrates many of the complexities of providing primary medical care in a third world environment.

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    COMPASSION CONNECTS: 2012 PILOT EPISODE

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From Our Blog

 

Acupuncture Relief Project  | Good Health Nepal | Angela Freeman

3:38AM - can’t sleep.  We have 6 days left of clinic. For those patients we see only once a week, today will be our final goodbye.  A lump forms in my throat as I write these words…I’m not ready to say goodbye. How can I slow down the hands of time…Nepali time?  The two months that I’ve been here have flown by.  I don’t want these remaining days to go at the same pace. I want to savor every moment. I want to hear more stories. I feel I've only scratched the surface. I want to embrace this beautiful community that has enriched my life so much. The generosity. The kindness. The love.  The thoughtfulness. The authenticity to which the Nepalese conduct their lives. I was not anticipating this…and I’m not ready to say goodbye.

Acupuncture Relief Project  | Good Health Nepal | Angela Freeman

I want to know why my hypertensive patient chose the vocation of a Christian pastor. Why deviate from Hinduism or Buddhism?  How my cervicalgia patient came to be a seamstress. Was that her childhood dream or a current means to an end?  Why does my osteoarthritic patient always wear button down shirts rather than the traditional clothes.  Such simple questions but I will always long for the answer if not asked.

The clinic waits in the dark; 4 beds, 12 chairs, 8 mudas, 2 supply cabinets and a small miscellaneous table soon to be filled with 5 practitioners, 100+/- patients, 4 interpreters and 3 students (and one ‘sponsored’ puppy!).  My practitioner mind now begins to worry about the same patients but through a different lens.  Will he remember the breathing techniques we discussed to ease his stress? Will she stay on her low sugar diet to control her glucose levels? Will he continue self-massage with the anti-inflammatory cream from the pharmacy and follow the dietary recommendations I have provided?

Acupuncture Relief Project  | Good Health Nepal | Angela Freeman

The next camp arrives in September. I hope my patients return. I hope the next group of practitioners can read my chart notes, understand my treatment plan (if one was provided - oops) and give my patients the love I tried to bestow upon them. I’m not ready to say goodbye. I have fallen in love with this community. Pretty good marketing strategy on Acupuncture Relief Project’s part - make em fall in love and they’ll be back!  I hope so…but for now and the remaining 6 days of clinic I will offer my professional services as an acupuncturist, my compassion and empathy as a sentient being and my heart as a curious child with a vulnerable soul.   Thank you Nepal :) --- Angela Freeman

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