• objective outcomes

    Our volunteers hone their clinical skills by properly assessing their patient's condition and setting achievable outcome goals.
  • Effective Treatment

    Frequent, focused treatments allow us to see positive changes in a patient's condition quickly.
  • Professional Development

    Acupuncture Relief Project offers opportunities for volunteers to gain valuable field experience and earn continuing education credits.
  • training & mentorship

    Acupuncture Relief Project offers meaningful training opportunities and employment to interpreters and local healthcare workers.
  • Patient Education

    By providing simple explanations, we help patients understand their health concerns and make informed choices regarding their care.
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Our Mission

Our unique model provides effective, efficient, primary care in rural Nepal. Read More
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Our Clinics

Since 2008, our clinics have provided over 350,000 primary care visits. Read More
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Our Partners

Influencing government policy and achieving educational goals. Read More
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Volunteer With Us

We need your help. Serve others while learning new skills. Read More
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Our Evidence

Case studies and field research helps us analyze our efficacy. Read More
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VOLUNTEER COMMUNITY CARE CLINICS IN NEPAL

Nepal remains one of the poorest countries in the world and has been plagued with political unrest and military conflict for the past decade. In 2015, a pair of major earthquakes devastated this small and fragile country. 

Since 2008, the Acupuncture Relief Project has provided over 300,000 treatments to patients living in rural villages outside of Kathmandu Nepal. Our efforts include the treatment of patients living without access to modern medical care as well as people suffering from extreme poverty, substance abuse and social disfranchisement.

Common conditions include musculoskeletal pain, digestive pain, hypertension, diabetes, stroke rehabilitation, uterine prolapse, asthma, and recovery from tuberculosis treatment, typhoid fever, and surgery.

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Featured Case Studies

  • Sequelae of Osteoarticular Tuberculosis +

    Rachael Haley BAppSci (TCM)December 2014 OVERVIEW A 58-year-old man, of rural Nepal, presents with left hip pain, reduced Read More
  • Spastic Quadriplegic Cerebral Palsy +

    Severely malnourished and non-ambulatory 11-year-old female presents with increased tone and spasticity in all extremities, frequent seizures, and Read More
  • Hemiplegia (Stroke Sequelae) with Acute Lung Consolidation +

    81-year-old female presents with complete left-sided hemiplegia following ischemic stroke 2 months ago. Over the course of 7 Read More
  • Emotional Depression +

    40-year-old woman presents with depression, emotional stress and dream-disturbed sleep. She presents with a secondary complaint of chronic Read More
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Compassion Connect : Documentary Series

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    In the aftermath of the 2015 Gorkha Earthquake, this episode explores the challenges of providing basic medical access for people living in rural areas.

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    Episode 1: Rural Primary Care

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    Acupuncture Relief Project tackles complicated medical cases through accurate assessment and the cooperation of both governmental and non-governmental agencies.

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    EPISODE 2: INTEGRATED MEDICINE

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    Cooperation with the local government yields a unique opportunities to establish a new integrated medicine outpost in Bajra Barahi, Makawanpur, Nepal.

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    EPISODE 3: WORKING WITH THE GOVERNMENT

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    Complicated medical cases require extraordinary effort. This episode follows 4-year-old Sushmita in her battle with tuberculosis.

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    EPISODE 4: CASE MANAGEMENT

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    Drug and alcohol abuse is a constant issue in both rural and urban areas of Nepal. Local customs and few treatment facilities prove difficult obstacles.

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    EPISODE 5: SOBER RECOVERY

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    Interpreters help make a critical connection between patients and practitioners. This episode explores the people that make our medicine possible and what it takes to do the job.

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    EPISODE 6: THE INTERPRETERS

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    This episode looks at the people and the process of creating a new generation of Nepali rural health providers.

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    EPISODE 7: FUTURE DOCTORS OF NEPAL

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    In this 2011, documentary, Film-maker Tristan Stoch successfully illustrates many of the complexities of providing primary medical care in a third world environment.

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    COMPASSION CONNECTS: 2012 PILOT EPISODE

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From Our Blog

 

Acupuncture Relief Project  | Good Health Nepal | Kaikit Wong

I meet Buddhi for the first time at the end of the second last week of the camp. He had a stroke 5 years ago which affected the mobility of his left arm and hand. Although he can walk quite normally without limping, the stroke left constant burning sensation in his left hip and leg. 

I think to myself, "OMG, I only have 6 days left in camp. What can I do for this man?"

Buddhi has almost no strength in his left arm, and poor grip in his hand. I ask him to hold a stone the size of his palm. He gingerly wraps his fingers around it, lifts up a few millimetres, then drops it. 

I ask Buddhi what he expects me to do for him. He wants just for his hip pain to go away. He believes there isn't much hope for his hand to recover.

"OK, " I said. "We will concentrate on treating your hip but I still want you to work this hand." I make him come for treatment everyday even though he travels a few hours to get to the clinic. I also gave him homework to practice holding the "magic stone" for one hour at home.

I treat him with scalp acupuncture, acupuncture on his left arm, hip and leg with electro-stimulation. This will be the same treatment repeated for the next few days.

The next day when Buddhi came in, I ask him to take the stone out of his bag and show me what he can do. I have a big surprise. Not only can he grip the stone, he is waving it above his head, with a beaming smile on his face. We clap and cheer his success. He said he had been practising until 6pm from the time he got home. 

Acupuncture Relief Project  | Good Health Nepal | Kaikit Wong

"Now try this stone." We progress to a stone smaller than his palm. He frowns with concentration, chasing the stone around while trying to hold it and losing it awkwardly. "Go home and keep practising." We continue the same acupuncture treatment.

On the fourth day, Buddhi proudly shows me how he has overcome the smaller stone. I hand him his clinic card and challenge him to grip it with thumb and finger of his weak hand. With much focus, he closes thumb and finger on the card. He looks at me, his eyes filled with disbelief. Tears were welling in my eyes. We clap and cheer again. The next task is to practice finger grip on a pebble and placing down with control.

By now, I refrain myself and the interpreter from helping him with his dressing and packing his bag. He may be slow but I insist that he uses his weak hand, instead of favouring the good hand. This forces the brain to rewire his weak hand. It is believed that stroke patients can lose the use of their weak limb through "learned nonuse" (Doidge, 2010)

On the fifth day, his finger grip improves. He is able to hold a pebble with 2 or 3 fingers and place it down with control. The burning sensation in his hip has reduced. Yet he is complaining of pain in his head due to daily scalp acupuncture.

As we part, I encourage him to continue practicing with the stones for the next few weeks while waiting for the clinic to reopen. As his brain rewires, he may, one day, be able to resume most of the use of his affected hand and return to farming again. That is the wish he expressed.

My stint in Nepal has come to an end. Buddhi's case touches my heart deeply each time I think of this experience. With his determination, he has shown me the magic in those stones that I picked from the roadside. ~ Kaikit Wong

 

Reference:

Doidge, N. (2010). The Brain That Changes Itself: stories of personal triumph from the frontiers of brain science. Scribe Publications Pty Ltd. Australia. Chapter 5.

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